Friday File

I can’t believe we’re already more than halfway through January. This month is rushing past. If you follow my Instagram account, you saw that I was in Southern California for the Rose Bowl on New Year’s Day, and then promptly came down with influenza when I got home. It was a bad flu, the kind with a fever and hallucinating dreams, and I was housebound throughout the so-called polar vortex. I missed a few days of work, so this was my first full week back to work.

Here are the links for the past couple weeks:


I love stories about apartments or offices that have remained untouched for decades. AnOther Magazine recently ran a post on Madame de Florian’s Paris apartment that wasn’t disturbed for 68 years and held secrets about the painter Giovanni Boldini’s lover, Marthe de Florian.

Have you read the “Do What You Love” column on Jacobin that’s been circulating social media? It’s an excellent take down of the DWYL myth — how it can be used to exploit workers and the fact that it is a very classist concept. A must read.

The current state of the American textile industry is recorded in photos and an essay, with a personal look at the factories still in production, in this NY Times piece.

Michelle Obama’s 2013 inauguration gown will be on display at the Smithsonian Museum of American History for one year. No word yet if the gown will become part of the museum’s First Ladies collection permanently.

I rarely buy Vogue anymore, but I’m psyched about Lena Dunham’s cover. I might just go out and pick it up for myself.

Costume Institute Renovated

Last night, news broke that the Metropolitan Museum of Art is renaming its Costume Institute as the Anna Wintour Costume Center. I freaked and thought I was being punked, and it turns out that we all were. Breathe a sigh of relief here.

The Met issued a statement that the renovated space that houses the Costume Institute will be called the Anna Wintour Costume Center, and that the curatorial department will continue to be known as the Costume Institute. The Anna Wintour Costume Center will house two exhibition galleries — a 4,200-square-foot flexible-design gallery called the Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch Gallery for big exhibitions and the Carl and Iris Barrel Apfel Gallery that introduces visitors to the costume collection. The Center will also include the Irene Lewisohn Costume Reference Library, a state-of-the-art conservation laboratory, research areas, and offices dedicated to fashion.

Looks like a lot of publications have some corrections to run. *cough cough New York Times, The Cut, Fashionologie cough cough*

However I loved the mistaken tweet by Vanessa Friedman of the Financial Times: “Met renames the Costume Institute the “Anna Wintour Costume Center.” And so is Diana Vreeland trumped.” Because even though the department isn’t getting renamed as the rumor went, Wintour now has naming rights to a space in the museum, which was something Vreeland never got in her tenure as special consultant to the Costume Institute.